Overview
Features
Download
Documentation
Community
Add-Ons & Services
The POCO C++ Libraries Blog

C++ Generic Coding vs. Java Frameworks

Filed under: News by guenter at 16:38

Interesting article by Dan Clarke in Reg Developer.

Dan asks why there are so many things that C++ developers should do by hand, while Java developers have lots of frameworks available.

Hopefully, with POCO as a solid foundation, we’ll soon see a lot more useful frameworks in C++, also.

3 Comments »
  1. One thing is for sure – is not a language superiority issue at all. I have yet to see a convincing argument that Java (programming language) is in any way, shape or form superior to C++ language. Java gained it’s ground because it is a) easier to learn than C++ and b) backed up by giant marketing machines. Seen long time ago on a PC near you with MS DOS and later Windows and VB. And then, there’s this “multi-platform” hoax. Stroustrup is absolutely right - Java is not platform independent. It is a platform.
    C++’s blessing and damnation at the same time (on top of complexity and steep learning curve) is too much variety of everything, starting from language constructs over naming conventions and programming styles all the way to general-purpose frameworks and GUIs. Indeed, a thorny path leads to C++ mastery. And then, there’s perpetually present style discussion. Although essentially superficial, at the end of the day style does matter, at least in consistency sense.

    Comment by alex on October 11, 2006, 21:49

  2. I am not familiar with c++ frameworks that attempt to do what POCO is doing but I have heard of ACE and visited their website. That framework comes acrosss as too complicated for me. But apparently it has been around for quite a while. My question is what is it that ACE does and POCO cannot do as of today?

    H.

    Comment by Hendrick on November 4, 2006, 15:41

  3. There’s currently no support for shared memory in POCO, but apart from that, I guess anything that can be done with ACE can also be done with POCO.

    ACE supports a few more (legacy) operating systems (at the cost of a quite messy code base…)

    Comment by guenter on November 6, 2006, 10:14

RSS RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a comment