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New Applied Informatics Blog

Filed under: News by guenter at 14:18

Over at the Applied Informatics website we have a new blog. The articles posted so far have covered topics like the Internet of Things, using POCO on Windows CE and iOS and Implementing UPnP Control Points on the iPhone.

Dynamic C++ at ACCU 2013

Filed under: Events,News by alex at 05:17

On April 11 2013, at the ACCU 2013 conference in Bristol (UK), a 90 minute “Dynamic C++” tutorial  will be presented:

Data from external sources comes in diverse types and brings along the need for datatype conversion. How can a C++ programmer accurately and efficiently transfer data from relational or XML database to JSON or HTML without stumbling over the C++ type checking mechanism? The answer is by using type erasure techniques; session will enumerate, explore and compare the most popular C++ type erasure solutions.

Given the above problem as well as both historical (ANSI C union and void*, MS COM Variant, boost::[variant, any, lexical_cast]) and recent (boost::type_erasure, Facebook folly::dynamic) development trends (including pending boost::any C++ standard proposal), it is obvious that there is a need for a way around the static nature of C++ language. There is also more than one solution to this problem; session will explore the internals of boost::[variant, any, type_erasure], folly::dynamic and Poco::Dynamic. Design, capabilities as well as pros and cons of each solution will be examined. Performance benchmark comparisons will be reviewed as well.

Type safety is an important feature of C++; type erasure is a necessary technique for modern software development. Session examines and compares existing solutions to these important concerns.

Stop by if you happen to be in the area or attending the conference.

Releases 1.4.6 and 1.5.1 Available

Filed under: News by guenter at 10:14

Stable release 1.4.6 brings some bugfixes and minor enhancements. See the CHANGELOG for the details. This is planned to be the last release in the 1.4 series.

Development release 1.5.1 is a major step towards the next stable 1.6.0 release planned for this spring. See the CHANGELOG for what’s new.

Get the source code from the download page or directly from GitHub.

Merry Christmas!

Filed under: Uncategorized by guenter at 09:13

Merry Christmas from the POCO C++ Libraries and Applied Informatics teams and all the best wishes for 2013!

xmas12

POCO 1.5.1 pre-release is on GitHub

Filed under: News by alex at 07:44

Current development branch is now frozen and tagged as 1.5.1 pre-release in GitHub.
Until release, the development branch will remain frozen and any changes will be pushed to separate branches.
Please download or check it out, run some tests, report bugs, etc.

git clone https://github.com/pocoproject/poco.git

Download links (LF line ending only!):
https://github.com/pocoproject/poco/archive/poco-1.5.1-pre-release.zip
https://github.com/pocoproject/poco/archive/poco-1.5.1-pre-release.tar.gz

Latest Commit:
https://github.com/pocoproject/poco/commit/16533ef73b7d4b68c0fac5247769aed800704bc0

1.5.1 Release is scheduled for Monday, December 24 2012.

Update: Release was postponed for at least a week. Pre-release archives can be downloaded from:

https://github.com/pocoproject/downloads/tree/master/poco-pre-1.5.1

Update 2: Release is available now:

http://pocoproject.org/blog/?p=726

POCO Team

Moving Bug/Issue Tracker from SF to Github

Filed under: News by alex at 18:53

During the month of December, we will be transitioning to GitHub issue tracker. By the end of 2012, all SF issues will be either (a) resolved, (b) discarded or (c) moved to GitHub. Please enter new issues in GitHub issue tracker. If you have a patch, please submit it as a pull request.
POCO Team

The Numbers

Filed under: Uncategorized by guenter at 20:51

For the 1.4.5 release, I’ve for the first time put the downloads on GitHub in addition to SourceForge. Since it took a very long time for the downloads to become available on SourceForge (and my frustration with SourceForge has been growing lately, especially after the upgrade disaster), the download page links to the files on GitHub. This lead to an interesting observation. While SourceForge download statistics show around 5.900 total downloads per month for October (which was a new all-time high), as of today GitHub shows a total of 8757 downloads for 1.4.5 after only a week. So where do these contradicting numbers come from? Ideas anyone?

New Applied Informatics C++ Libraries and Tools Release 2012.1

Filed under: News by guenter at 11:53

The C++ Libraries and Tools from Applied Informatics are based on the POCO C++ Libraries and add additional features such as Remoting for RPC/IPC and SOAP/WSDL web services, Open Service Platform for building modular, extensible applications, DNSSD/Zeroconf, Universal Plug and Play, Fast Infoset processing or secure remote access to smart devices. New in release 2012.1 is support for C++ code generation from XML Schema and WSDL documents, allowing Remoting to invoke SOAP 1.1/1.2 web services created using other middleware technologies such as Java JAX-WS or Microsoft .NET WCF. In addition to SOAP 1.1 and 1.2, the new Remoting also supports MTOM, HTTP Basic and Digest authentication and HTTP compression (gzip content encoding), as well as remote events with the new TCP transport.
A free evaluation version is available for download.

Stable Release 1.4.5 Available

Filed under: News by guenter at 11:52

This release brings support for Visual Studio 2012, as well as some bugfixes and enhancements. See the CHANGELOG for the details. Available on the download page.

Fork it!

Filed under: News,Tips & Tricks by alex at 03:08

We’ve been asked and nudged for a long time to make the move; like everything else, it was something that requires resources of time and effort so it did not happen as fast as it should have. But finally, we’ve made it over to GitHub and now we can enjoy the benefits. Branching and merging is simple and intuitive, forking is readily available; we already have 632* “forkers” and 27100* “stargazers“.

(* edited on Jan 13 2013)

I like the code-centered paradigm of GitHub – everything (as it should) revolves around and is linked with code. My favorite feature is the “network graph” (depicted below) showing who forked and what changes were synced. We have a proto-wiki with roadmap and supported platforms.

So, if you have not done it yet, what the fork are you waiting for?  Stop by, hang around and – fork it!

The POCO Network Graph

The POCO Network Graph

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